Thomas LaVeist elected to the
Institute of Medicine of the
National Academy of Sciences

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About Us

There are approximately 160 million descendants of the Transatlantic Slave Trade living today throughout the Western Hemisphere. The International Conference on Health in the African Diaspora – ICHAD 2012 – explored how this population is faring and what can be done to improve their health. From Canada to Argentina, people of African descent share a common ancestral history of forced migration and marginalization that provides an important ‘case study’ for understanding the complex relationship health, history, and the broader human experience.

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Testimonials

Erika Leslie, USA

I’m Jamaican and this conference spoke about my family, my health, and my life. I learned how migration and acculturation has affected other groups and their health. The conference was a broad representation of the African Diaspora. I met people from Nigeria, Ghana, and Trinidad and Tobago.

Erika Leslie, USA

Courtney Sinclair Thomas, USA

One of the biggest takeaways is despite our differences in culture and language the same social determinants are driving these health disparities. One event— the transatlantic slave trade–has driven a wide variety of health outcomes and social injustices. That perspective is really going to influence my future work

Courtney Sinclair Thomas, USA

ICHAD Attendee

Learning about measurement strategy was one of the most valuable parts of conference.

ICHAD Attendee

ICHAD Attendee

Intimate partner violence in the African diaspora needs to be addressed. This was probably one of the most important breakout sessions Very informative and useful information!

ICHAD Attendee

ICHAD Attendee

Great, great presentations! Race has to be measured by genetic ancestry and socioeconomic status/environment. We are diverse in more ways than one.

ICHAD Attendee

ICHAD Attendee

I learned so much in this presentation on the importance of genetics and how it fits with social, cultural and historical context.

ICHAD Attendee

Get The Book

Legacy of the Crossing: Life, death and triumph among descendants of the world’s greatest forced migration

legacyLegacy of the Crossing deploys solid research to chart the health status and outcomes among descendants of the Transatlantic slave trade. Leading scholars and health advocates from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Jamaica, Panama, Nicaragua, United States and Venezuela share insights on chronic disease, HIV/AIDS, infant and maternal mortality and the social determinants of health.