Recent News

Thomas LaVeist Elected to the Institute of Medicine

Thomas A. LaVeist, the William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and founding director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. LaVeist’s research focuses on …

Brazil launches African higher education collaboration

Brazil has launched a major higher education cooperation programme with Portuguese-speaking Africa. Under the project, educators and researchers from 20 Brazilian centres of higher education will provide services in five African nations. The Portuguese-speaking nations include Angola, Cape Verde, Equatorial Guinea, Mozambique and São Tomé and Principe. The Africa-Brazil higher education programme was drafted at …

George W. Bush’s Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather Was a Slave Trader

BUNCE ISLAND, Sierra Leone—Twelve American presidents owned slaves, eight while serving in office, and at least 25 presidents count slave owners among their ancestors. But new historical evidence shows that a direct ancestor of George W. and George H.W. Bush was part of a much more appalling group: Thomas Walker was a notorious slave trader …

Fight HIV in One Click

Black gay and bisexual men bear the heaviest burden of HIV in the United States. Our nation has gone from HIV/AIDS being a gay white male identified disease to a black gay male disease, and it’s also increasing among other Latino men as well. The Ford Foundation and National Minority AIDS Council have teamed up …

Closing Racial And Ethnic Disparity Gaps: Implications Of The Affordable Care Act

For all intents and purposes, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the President’s signature piece of legislation, will provide more health care coverage to poor and underserved populations. Persistently disadvantaged communities have much further to go than those with insurance, and new means of accessing and paying for care will benefit them disproportionately. Nevertheless, with more …

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, the Sequel

By REBECCA SKLOOT Published: March 23, 2013 LAST week, scientists sequenced the genome of cells taken without consent from a woman named Henrietta Lacks. She was a black tobacco farmer and mother of five, and though she died in 1951, her cells, code-named HeLa, live on. They were used to help develop our most important vaccines …

For Blacks in Cuba, the Revolution Hasn’t Begun

By ROBERTO ZURBANO Published: March 23, 2013 CHANGE is the latest news to come out of Cuba, though for Afro-Cubans like myself, this is more dream than reality. Over the last decade, scores of ridiculous prohibitions for Cubans living on the island have been eliminated, among them sleeping at a hotel, buying a cellphone, selling a house …

Within mainstream environmentalist groups, diversity is lacking

By Darryl Fears, Published: March 24 Fred Tutman was a lonely man when he picked up the telephone that day. He was the tough-talking protector of Maryland’s Patuxent River, a courtroom brawler who took on anyone who contaminated water, but he couldn’t shake a nagging hurt that he was nearly invisible within his own profession. He called Marc Yaggi, …

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